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Learning the Value of Tradition at Camp

The holidays are around the corner.  During that time of year, the word “tradition” gets thrown around a lot.  But how many people actually understand what tradition is really?  Perhaps it’s the emphasis on forward thinking and constantly in-motion global community that has caused many to confuse “tradition” with “routine.”  They’ve both become something that we do on a regular basis in order to establish or maintain a consistency or pattern in our behavior.  So what really distinguishes “tradition” from “routine”?

First, routine is something that one person does but might not necessarily have in common with others.  Most people brush their teeth at some point in time in the morning.  Few people do it at exactly the same time.  Some shower first.  Others eat breakfast.  Eventually, everyone brushes their teeth but the experience is, for all intents and purposes, individual.  There is no shared significance.

Tradition, on the other hand, is by definition community oriented.  It’s a shared custom, belief, or activity with a common understanding of the reason for its practice.  Many of us eat turkey at Thanksgiving because we symbolically associate it with that first meal between the pilgrims and native Americans.  It’s a tradition.

Second, routine, unlike tradition, is not necessarily multi-generational or even long-term.  It’s something done for a specified length of time.  While we maintain some routines for all or much of our lives, others are short term.  If one gets the flu, for instance, one might temporarily take up a routine of antibiotics.  But once the flu subsides, so does that routine.

On the other hand, tradition is something that is a common bond between multiple generations.  It’s an acknowledgment that an event or action was significant to someone tied to our past, and the observance of traditions our way of paying tribute to that event or action as well demonstrating our understanding of it.

Finally, routine is task oriented.  We take up routine in order to accomplish a goal.  There is an intended result in routine.  Tradition, however, is an observance.  Routine is a way of moving forward, whereas tradition pays tribute to the importance of the past.

By now, you’re surely asking yourself what any of this has to do with summer camp. Simply this: in a culture that places a significant amount of importance on the establishment of routine, the value of tradition is increasingly less understood and appreciated.  Summer camps, however, are grounded in tradition.  They’re  a place where campers and staff members alike get refresher courses in the power of tradition.  Whether it’s at a campfire, a sing along, or an activity specific to the camp, there are literally hundreds of opportunities every summer for those at a summer camp to bond through tradition.  Many former summer campers and staff members actually name “tradition” as one of their highlights of summer camp.  So if tradition has become an element of holidays past, consider giving your children a future opportunity to enjoy tradition at summer camp in 2013.

Camp: A Different Set of Expectations

Okay, admit it.  You’ve found yourself spending a considerable amount of time admiring that candle your daughter gave you on her camp’s Visiting Day or those wooden bookends your son brought home.  Part of you wonders how come you never got to make stuff that cool when you were a kid while another part of you is mystified by how the arts and crafts staff of your child’s summer camp was able to draw out the Picasso in your little ones.    After all, you can barely get them to focus long enough to make a poster for their science projects.  What is it about camp that seems to facilitate children’s creativity?

Sure it’s woodsy and remote, even quaint–the perfect place for children to feel free to be themselves.  They certainly do a lot of things at camp that they don’t get to do at home.  And you did spend the entire summer looking at photos of your daughter posing in a rainbow colored tutu—Did she ever take that thing off?—and of your son covered in face paint knowing full well that neither of them would EVER dress like that at home.  And was that your son dressed as a dog singing on stage?  Singing?  Him?  Really?  And last night he just told you, by the way, that he is trying out for the school play this year because the camp play was really fun.  He would never ever—even if someone had double dog dared him—have auditioned for a play before camp.  What changed?  The Expectations.

There are a lot of reasons children find themselves exploring more creative avenues at summer camp, but one really big one is that the expectations are different.  Children learn to respond to expectations.  Moreover, they learn to respond to the expectations of individuals.  They understand that their parents have expectations as do their teachers, siblings, friends, coaches, so on and so forth.  Whether  we’re comfortable admitting it or not, a lot of the expectations in that ten month world campers know as “winter” in some way promote conformity.  Expectations placed on children at home, in school, etc. emphasize the importance of following rules and established guidelines.  Of course, camp expectations do this, too, but the emphasis at camp is not to find one’s place in that larger whole by blending in but by standing out.  Camp is a place in which children are encouraged to try new things in a quest to find their passion.

Sure you’re thinking of those photos of your daughter holding up her latest tie-dye creation for the camp photographer’s camera—those ones in ewhich she was covered to her elbows in dye—and you’re thinking that’s you wouldn’t really classify tie-dye as a “passion.”  Maybe not.  But it could be the beginning of one, the spark that leads to an interest in art or the arts, or even just the memory of trying something new that turned out to be fun that lends courage to trying other new things.  The expectations in the “world” of camp is that campers will explore it.  Perhaps this is why it’s no surprise that many well known figures attended summer camp and attribute it to being the place where they found long-term direction.  Sure, learning how to plunk out folk songs on a guitar is a long way from the philharmonic and being part of the chorus in the camp play is certainly not Broadway, but the idea is the same and, for many campers, it’s the start of building enough self confidence to stand out.

Camp: Memories For A Lifetime

Duffles are unpacked. School is once again in full swing. Summer ­ and camp ­is far on the horizon.

But throughout the school year ­and for the rest of their lives ­campers will draw upon, and draw strength from, the positive experiences of the past summer.

Dr. Christopher Thurber describes some of the transformations we witness every summer at camp. A clinical psychologist, he notes that many children head to camp with “core fears.” These include being judged, looking “less than cool” and being alone.

Fearing judgment can come from many reasons: one’s background, body size or perceived lack of physical skills, for example.

At camp, the staff — and the environment they create — gives each camper a chance to show off his or her special talents and skills in an emotionally safe place. There’s nothing like positive judgment to make a child’s summer.

The fear of not being successful can cause some campers to shy away from trying new activities. That’s why it’s so important for staff members to lead by example and try new things. We call it “modeling,” and we emphasize it over and over among our staff AND campers. Modeling behavior can sometimes make one look goofy ­ but it sends the message that there’s nothing wrong with being silly, trying new things and taking safe risks.

Camp is a place where caring, committed, compassionate adults provide stability and warmth. It is this environment and community that gives children and teens the strength and confidence to say, “I am going to go for it. I can overcome this. I can do this.”

When campers return home each year, they talk about activities, friends and counselors. They remember fun and funny moments. They seldom verbalize the fears they’ve had, and how they’ve met them head on. But that is as much a part of any camp experience as swimming, cookouts or Spirit Days. And confronting these fears is what builds self-esteem, develops a greater sense of self, and allows our children to take safe risks and thrive far beyond the fishbowl of camp.

LAUREL SOUTH…Summer 2012

Now that our campers have all returned home and they transition back from being cabinmates, Spirit Days leaders, Rainbow Games-warriors into neighbors, students, and classmates you may notice they seem just a little different. Sharing a communal living space at Laurel South instills a sense of responsibility to those around them and empathy for those friends and counselors living and learning with them everyday. Our team sports build a sense of camaraderie and sportsmanship that teach our campers what the game is really about – the unity of the team will always be more important than any single win.
Many campers perform on stage, whether in a musical or at an evening program, for the very first time and are empowered with a sense of bravery and accomplishment at having the courage to do so and the knowledge of a new skill learned. At camp, children have the freedom to choose their friends and what they like to eat and even some of the things they love to do…and they do it with great success. They come home with a new found sense of independence and confidence. While it’s always a little bittersweet to watch your children grow up quickly, we are grateful to be a part of their growing process and we, too, love seeing how much they flourish and mature each summer at Camp Laurel South.
This was a fantastic summer for all of us, we hope you’re enjoying hearing all of your campers’ stories, and we cannot wait to do it all again next year!

Thanks For A Great Summer!

As Summer 2012 comes to a close, we want to thank all our amazing campers for being part of the Laurel South family. From “S” days to Spirit Days, Intercamp Games and Tournaments to Theater Shows, we’ve created a lifetime of unbelievable memories. No memories, though, are greater than those of the friendships made while at Laurel South. We want to thank our wonderful CIT’s for their years at Laurel South. To the rest of our summer family, we can’t wait to see you back next summer on the shores of Crescent Lake. While we’re sad to see the 2012 summer end, we’re psyched the countdown to the 2013 summer has officially begun. It’s been a fantastic summer in the great state of Maine!

The Beat Goes on…

Oh what a beautiful day in the state of Maine!!! On Tuesday night, our Rangeley men took to the gridiron for an exciting Moose Bowl. The tailgating was wonderful, the half-time dance show was unbelievable, and the Laurel South spirit of friendship and sportsmanship was on display in abundance. Last night was our incredible theater performance, “Schoolhouse Rock!” Tomorrow night we’ll gather to watch our second show, “Mama Mia.” Today we had an awesome time at Funtown: the rides, the food, the friendship, the memories. We are gearing up for our final “A” and “B” days of the session and getting excited for all the culminating activities. While we are sad that the summer is coming to a close, it has been another magical one at Laurel South!

It’s August…

Every August, days grow shorter. And it’s not just hours of daylight. The time between now and the end of camp gets compressed too. Each night, the end of a magical summer draws closer.

Finally, we all go home. It’s a bittersweet time for everyone. Packing seems so final.

But not everything a camper brings home fits in a duffel. Certain things are impossible to stow.

Independence. Your child may have been gone for a month or two….but he or she comes home more than several weeks “older.” Away from parents, siblings, familiar teachers and hometown friends, campers gain a sense of independence that serves as an important springboard for the coming year.

Skills and confidence. Kayaking. Acting. Tent-putting-up. Lacrosse. Stand-up Paddleboarding. Your child returns home with a bag full of new tricks. She may not kayak again until next summer, and he might not try out for the school play. But every September, campers know they can do things they never thought possible way back in June.

Friendships. It can be strange hearing stories about youngsters you don’t know well. Suddenly your child talks about other towns, schools and states. Your cell bill may include calls all over the country. Camp is a great way to make new friends. And those friendships are far deeper and real than anything on Facebook.

Relationships. More than friendships, campers develop real relationships. Living together 24/7, they develop bonds – and not just with peers. Campers live with and learn from young adults, and older directors. The unhurried pace of camp life nurtures many strong relationships.

Strong bodies and a healthy glow. Sure, kids wear hats and sunscreen. But nothing beats summer days, spent in the water and out of doors.

Memories. You can’t stow memories in luggage. You can’t ship them home. But they belong to every camper, and they’ll never be lost.

One Week to Go and the Action is Non-Stop!

With one amazing week left, the 2012 summer continues to be action-packed!!! Saturday began with Movie Morning, as each camper chose an age-appropriate film. After lunch, we were impressed with the talent on display at the Camper Variety Show, as campers sang, danced, told jokes, performed skits and, of course, the day concluded with our incredible Laurel South Carnival. Tonight, the entire Laurel South family will gather for a Council Fire. Tomorrow night is the 2nd Annual Moose Bowl. Our 2 unbelievable Theater Shows are right around the corner. And, of course, in between there’s tennis, skiing, basketball, baseball, ceramics, rocketry, lacrosse, fitness, crafts and more! The good times never stop at Laurel South!

Casco Fun Never Ends…

What an amazing summer we’re having! Our 6th Grade boys just returned from their amazing overnight camping trip at Wolfe’s Neck. The 8th Grade Boys and Girls are excited for their overnight trip to beautiful North Conway, NH tomorrow. Intercamp games and tournaments are in high gear. Saturday, the entire Laurel South family will enjoy Movie Morning, our awesome camper Variety Show and, of course, the famous Laurel South Carnival! The weather has been excellent, and the fun, activity, instruction and friendships never end at Camp Laurel South!

Spirit Days, Canobie Lake and More Fun…

Friday started out as any other “B” Day. Campers and counselors enjoyed their morning activities before heading off to lunch. Everything changed during lunch, however, as our amazing CIT’s broke Spirit Days 2012! For the next day-and-a-half, the Blue Justice League and the Green Avengers battled it out in the friendliest of competitions. The highlights included the CIT’s running CHAOS and the entire camp participating in the Moosehead Relay! In the end, we all reunited as one – the Laurel South family. Yesterday, the entire camp had an amazing time at Canobie Lake. We all enjoyed the rides, food and especially the friendship. The weather is gorgeous and we look forward to another amazing “A” Day tomorrow filled with Tennis, Riding, Waterskiing, Baseball, Ceramics, Basketball, Hockey, Rocketry and more!

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